Tricounty News

Summer heat can be deadly to pets (2)

As the dangerous heat returns and the hot days of summer come upon us, doctors from BluePearl Veterinary Partners recommend taking certain precautions to ensure your pet doesn’t suffer from any heat-related injuries. 

“It’s less than a week into summer and we’ve already seen multiple cases of heatstroke at several of our locations,” said Dr. Neil Shaw, chief medical officer of BluePearl. “It’s very important for people to remember that their pets are sensitive to the heat.”

BluePearl doctors recommend for pets to be kept in an air conditioned environment during the heat of the day and to limit strenuous activities such as running and playing. 

“Focus on outdoor activities either early in the morning or late in the day,” Shaw said. 

If your pet does become overheated, spray the animal down with room temperature or cool water, but never ice water. Ice cold water causes a decrease in blood flow to the skin and heat can’t escape the body, which makes heat exhaustion symptoms worse.

Don’t give sports drinks or electrolyte supplements to pets. Dogs cool off by panting and they do not sweat like people. Supplements like sports drinks can actually harm animals and make pets sick.

Lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea and dark red gums are all signs of heat related distress. If your pet is panting uncontrollably or collapses, take the animal to your veterinarian or nearest emergency veterinary hospital immediately. 

Pet owners should also remember to make sure their pets have access to plenty of water at all times. Also, never leave your pet locked in a vehicle with the windows closed.

“Ultimately, any time you feel your pet may be in need of medical assistance, please don’t hesitate to get them to your veterinarian as soon as possible,” said Shaw. “Time is often the difference between life and death.”

Leave the fireworks to the experts, MMA advises

This Fourth of July do yourself and your family a favor, stay safe and leave the fireworks to the experts, advises the Minnesota Medical Association.

“Statistics show, year after year, that they are just so dangerous,” said MMA President Dan Maddox, M.D. “Too many young people suffer eye and hand injuries from fireworks each summer. We feel the best way to celebrate Independence Day is to leave the fireworks to professionals.”

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) on average 200 people go to the emergency room every day with fireworks-related injuries in the month around the Fourth of July. The most common injuries are to hands and fingers. The CPSC reports that fireworks were involved in an estimated 9,600 injuries treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments during calendar year 2011.

There was an estimated 8,600 fireworks-related injuries during 2010.

“The MMA would prefer that fireworks not even be available, but as long as they are around we encourage everyone to use extreme caution with them,” Maddox said.

About the Minnesota Medical Association

The Minnesota Medical Association is a non-profit professional association representing physicians, residents and medical students. With more than 10,000 members, the MMA is dedicated to being the indispensable and unified voice of physicians for advancing the practice of medicine, the profession and patient health. Find the MMA online at www.mnmed.org.

 

MMA advises leave the fireworks to the experts

This Fourth of July do yourself and your family a favor, stay safe and leave the fireworks to the experts, advises the Minnesota Medical Association.

“Statistics show, year after year, that they are just so dangerous,” said MMA President Dan Maddox, M.D. “Too many young people suffer eye and hand injuries from fireworks each summer. We feel the best way to celebrate Independence Day is to leave the fireworks to professionals.”

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) on average 200 people go to the emergency room every day with fireworks-related injuries in the month around the Fourth of July. The most common injuries are to hands and fingers. The CPSC reports that fireworks were involved in an estimated 9,600 injuries treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments during calendar year 2011.

There was an estimated 8,600 fireworks-related injuries during 2010.

“The MMA would prefer that fireworks not even be available, but as long as they are around we encourage everyone to use extreme caution with them,” Maddox said.

About the Minnesota Medical Association

The Minnesota Medical Association is a non-profit professional association representing physicians, residents and medical students. With more than 10,000 members, the MMA is dedicated to being the indispensable and unified voice of physicians for advancing the practice of medicine, the profession and patient health. Find the MMA online at www.mnmed.org.

 

Presentation on dementia June 12

Judy Berry and Lakeview Ranch/Dementia Care Foundation have invited Teepa Snow, national trainer and dementia education specialist to provide two presentations at 9:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 12, at the Dassel History Center. Suggested donation of $20.

For more information, contact Wendy at Lakeview Ranch (320) 275-5517. This is an extraordinary opportunity to see one of the leaders in dementia education, Teepa’s presentations are valuable for professionals, caregivers and those with dementia.

Support group for eating disorders


The St. Cloud Hospital Behavioral Health Clinic is offering a Family and Friends Support Group for Eating Disorders from 4:30-6 p.m. the first Thursday of the month at CentraCare Health Plaza in the Leonard, Street & Deinard room. There will be no support group in July. Groups are led by a licensed psychologist or registered dietitian and provide support through education and sharing to friends and family of individuals with eating disorders. Participants will learn tips for making mealtimes less stressful, how to respond to food and body image struggles and what to say or not to say.

Each month different topics will be explored. This month’s session will highlight the Minnesota Semistarvation Experiment, which found that individuals with eating disorders have thoughts and behaviors similar to those of men who experienced semi-starvation.

There is no cost to attend. For more information, please call Bette Bakke, PhD, LP, at (320) 229-4918.