Tricounty News

This Week in the American Civil War: October 14-20, 1863

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1863

Confederate Lieutenant General Ambrose Powell Hill’s leading corps of the Army of Northern Virginia struck the retreating rear units of Federal Major General George G. Meade’s Army of the Potomac near Bristoe Station, Va. However, Hill’s forces were not sufficient to defeat the strongly posted Federals and the Confederates also failed to strike the center of the long Union column as it retreated. The rearguard action gave Meade time to prepare his lines in and around Centreville, Va., not far from Manassas, the site of two previous battlegrounds. Other fighting in the same area broke out at Catlett’s Station, Gainesville, McLean’s Ford, St. Stephen’s Church, Grove Church, near Centreville and at Brentsville.

Thursday, Oct. 15, 1863

The Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac, facing each other in the area along Bull Run, skirmished at McLean’s, Blackburn’s and Mitchell’s fords and at Manassas and Oak Hill. Each army tried to ascertain the other’s strength and intentions.

In Charleston Harbor, S.C., the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley sank for a second time during a practice dive. Hunley, the inventor, and seven men died. The vessel was raised again.

Friday Oct. 16, 1863

Orders from Washington created the Military Division of the Mississippi, combining the Departments of the Ohio, the Cumberland and the Tennessee with Major General Ulysses Grant in command. Grant was ordered from Vicksburg, Miss., to Cairo, Ill., while Secretary of War Edwin Stanton himself was on his way west to meet with Grant.

Saturday Oct. 17, 1863

Federal Major General Ulysses Grant, at Cairo, Ill., was ordered to proceed to Louisville to receive instructions. En route at Indianapolis, Grant arrived by accident at the same time as Secretary of War Stanton, also heading for Louisville to meet with the general. Proceeding together, Stanton handed Grant his orders that created the Military Division of the Mississippi under his command. The orders had two versions for Grant to choose from. One left department commanders much as they were. The other relieved Major General William Rosecrans from command of the Department of the Cumberland and the army at Chattanooga. Grant accepted the order relieving Rosecrans and placed Major General George H. Thomas in command. Major General William T. Sherman was to lead the Department of the Tennessee, and Major General Ambrose Burnside was to continue heading the Department of the Ohio. Rosecrans, badly beaten at Chickamauga, was criticized for slowness and for being surrounded at Chattanooga. It was hoped that a more stable commander operating under Grant directly would be more effective.

In Washington, President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for 300,000 more volunteers for Federal armies.

 

Sunday, Oct. 18, 1863

Federal Major General Ulysses Grant assumed command of the Military Division of the Mississippi, which gave him control over Federal military operations from the Mississippi River on the west, to the Appalachian Mountains in the east. This came after rumors from Chattanooga that Major General William Rosecrans might retreat. Major General George H. Thomas was now in command of Rosecrans army.

Monday Oct. 19, 1863

It was a day of light fighting as skirmishes broke out at Gainesville, New Baltimore, Catlett’s Station, Haymarket and Buckland Mills, Va.; Zollicoffer and Spurgeon’s Mill, Tenn.; Smith’s Bridge, Miss., Murrell’s Inlet, S.C.; and at Honey Creek, Mo.

Tuesday, Oct. 20, 1863

The Confederate cavalry retired across the Rappahannock River as the campaign towards Bristoe and Manassas ended, resulting in little change of territory and few losses. The casualties for the campaign were 205 Confederates killed; 1,176 wounded for a total of 1,381 casualties. The Federals sustained losses of 136 killed, 733 wounded and 1,423 missing for a total of 2,292 soldiers.

Major General Ulysses Grant, after conferring with Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, left Louisville, Ky., for Chattanooga, Tenn. From Nashville, he wired instructions to Major General Ambrose Burnside in east Tennessee, as well as to other officers.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of Oct. 14-20, 1863

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Participated in the Army of the Potomac’s Bristow Campaign until Oct. 22, 1863.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in the Siege of Chattanooga, Tenn., until
Nov. 23, 1863.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Participated in the capture of Little Rock, Ark., where they remained for garrison duty until April 28, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On the march from Helena, Ark., to Corinth, Miss.; then Memphis and Chattanooga, Tenn., until Oct. 20, 1863.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Bear Creek, Miss., until Oct. 14, 1863.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty in Minnesota until June 9, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in St. Louis, Mo., until April 20, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty in Minnesota until May 24, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Moved to Jefferson City, Mo., for duty guarding railroad from Kansas Line to near
St. Louis. Stationed at Rolla, Jefferson City, LaMine Bridge, Warrensburg, Independence, Knob Noster, Kansas City, Waynesville and Franklin with headquarters in Jefferson City until April 14, 1864, and at Rolla from April 14 – May 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty and provost duty at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., until April 21, 1864.

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – On duty at Fort Ripley and Fort Snelling until Dec. 7, 1863.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – On duty along the Tennessee River until Nov. 14, 1863.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Organized at Fort Snelling and St. Paul. Companies A, B, C and D marched to Pembina for duty until Nov. 13, 1863.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty at Vicksburg, Miss., until April 4, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery, Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty in the Siege of Chattanooga, Tenn., until Nov. 23, 1863.

3rd Battery, Minnesota Light Artillery – Four sections on duty at Pembina, Fort Ripley, Fort Ridgely and Fort Snelling until June 5, 1864.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Army of the Potomac’s Bristow Campaign until Oct. 22, 1863.

Boiler explodes at Kimball Creamery, 1954

Reprinted from the Tri-County News Sept. 6, 2001.W-Creameryexplosion284

Kimball was shaken Friday morning, Dec. 24, 1954, about 11:30 when a large boiler at the Kimball Creamery and milk drying plant exploded and shot into the air, landing in the driveway between the creamery and the drug store.

The force of the explosion tore the roof from the rear of the building, crumbled the walls, and a fire was started. At the moment of the explosion, only two men employees were within the building. Tony Pelzer received wounds in the abdomen, and burns and lacerations about his face and arms. He was taken by Granite City Ambulance to the St. Cloud Hospital where he had surgery to determine the extent of the abdominal injury. His condition proved to be not serious, and it was thought he might be released by Wednesday.

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Civil War digest: This week 150 years ago Oct. 7-13, 1863

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday, Oct. 7, 1863

Federal signalmen observed unusual movement in the Confederate army along the Rapidan River in Virginia and skirmishing flared at Hazel River and at Utz’s and Mitchell’s fords.

Skirmishing also occurred at Farmington, Blue Springs and Sims’s Farm near Shelbyville, Tenn.; near Warsaw, Mo.; Evening Shade and Ferry’s Ford, Ark.; in the Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory; and at Charles Town and Summit Point, W.V.

Thursday, Oct. 8, 1863

It was a quiet day, even though fighting broke out near James City and along Robertson’s River, Va., and near Chattanooga, Tenn.

Confederate President Jefferson Davis arrived in Atlanta and praised Georgia’s war effort, eulogizing the patriotism of troops. He was greeted by cheers.

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Civil War digest: This week 150 years ago Sept 30-Oct. 6, 1863

Major highlights for the week

Wednesday, Sept. 30, 1863

Skirmishes occurred at Cotton Port Ford, Tenn., along with Neersville and Woodville, Va., plus the destruction of a Confederate salt works at Back Bay, Va. Mild bombardment of Fort Sumter continued in Charleston Harbor.

Thursday, Oct. 1, 1863

In cavalry operations around Chattanooga, Tenn., Major General Joseph Wheeler’s Confederate forces fought at Mountain Gap near Smiths’s Crossroads, and also captured a large Federal wagon train. From Nashville, President Abraham Lincoln was informed that all the 11th and part of the 12th Corps en route to the Chattanooga area had passed through the Tennessee capital.

In Virginia, investigations and skirmishing occurred near Culpeper Courthouse, Auburn and Lewisville. Fighting also broke out at Elizabethtown, Ark., and near Harper’s Ferry, W.V.

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Kimball Telephone Company

Reprinted from the Tri-County News April 19, 2001.

Communication in Maine Prairie was very limited. One news source was the St. Cloud newspaper that was delivered by the stagecoach as it passed through town. The other was a single telephone that was located several miles out of town in a private home where all calls were made and/or received.

The first franchise for a telephone company in Kimball was made in 1905. The original owner is not currently known. Phillip Vollmen purchased the company in 1913, and operated it for several years. In 1917, he sold it to J.W. Johnson, who owned and operated it until 1928, when he sold it to Henry Steckleberg.

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